The Task Graveyard

It’s where my ideas go to die.  But like the mighty phoenix, I have one idea for a task that keeps rising from the ashes. It just won’t die.

If Bruce Willis was a math task, I’ve seen his face.

I can’t help it. I’m fascinated by them. The containers below have sat on my desk for almost a year and everyday they taunt me.  Like a banshee in the night, they scream to be played with and I couldn’t take it anymore.  So yesterday… WE DANCED! 

Now I’m clueless. Where do I go from here? 

Before I rebury this guy in the file “Never to be Found Again,” I would love for you to play #WCYDWT with me.


I’d love to hear your thoughts, ideas, where you think it fits (grade level), or whatever else you could do with it.

For what it’s worth…here’s what I know and where I’m at so far.

About gfletchy

K-8 math consumer trying to listen and learn each day. Stay thirsty my friends!
This entry was posted in Against the Norm, Intellectual Need, Making Math Accessible, Modeling, Planning, SMPs, Teacher Content, Teaching in a Context. Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to The Task Graveyard

  1. howardat58 says:

    The pyramid is faked, the water droplets are reversed at the bottom.

  2. Robyn Ovrick says:

    Took the time to look at it. Even tried to do some “calculations”. Can’t help you with this one. But the visual effect is awesome and I can see why you hesitate to bury it!

    On Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 10:50 AM, Questioning My Metacognition wrote:

    > gfletchy posted: “It’s where my ideas go to die. But like the mighty > phoenix, I have one idea for a task that keeps rising from the ashes. It > just won’t die. If Bruce Willis was a math task, I’ve seen his face. I > can’t help it. I’m fascinated by them. The containers bel” >

  3. Melynee says:

    Could you do something along the lines of estimation 180 where pieces are introduced one at a time? I want to be able to explore the relationship of the containers when they are empty. I want to compare smaller volumes from each container using another container and what those volumes look like in each container. Then I could engage in: Knowing this…… I think this because….. this would mean this at this point……

    Does that make sense?

    • gfletchy says:

      It does make sense and that’s what I’m trying to figure out. I’m wondering if I could eliminate some things to generate a main question that’s more concise. There’s so much happening here and you’ve confirmed that. Thanks Melynee for chiming in her.

  4. Amanda Boatwright says:

    I say Flash fractions? 3rd grade..estimate when it gets to 1/4, 1/2 1/3 etc.

  5. Simon Gregg says:

    I agree with you, Graham – there’s definitely something here!
    But, like you, I’m not sure exactly how this could go…
    You could try running it with a class and see what they notice and ask.
    You could also maybe try a simpler version, like https://youtu.be/OUDjY6vJ8pw stopping at 0:30 to get students to ask the questions, and estimate.
    But how to introduce a calculation stage…?
    Maybe have a collection of these to play with, and water?
    Not sure…

  6. Jon Orr says:

    My immediate thought was for students to determine how much faster the prism filled compared to the pyramid. Since 3 pyramids is the prism water should be flowing 3 times as fast for them to fill at the same time. Hmmm. That’s all I got for now. I’ll think on this.

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