From Memory and Memorization: There IS a Difference

Question: If you memorize your basic math facts have you learned them?

The term from memory is used twice in the K-5 math standards (here & here) and they continue to be the most misunderstood words I encounter each day.  The term “from memory” does not suggest that students mindlessly  memorize their basic facts the way we were taught.

Here’s my first stab at an Ignite Talk explaining the difference between  from memory and memorization that I recently shared with some teachers and administrators.

Here’s the link to the Prezi


About gfletchy

K-8 math consumer trying to listen and learn each day. Stay thirsty my friends!
This entry was posted in Fact Fluency, Making Math Accessible, Strategy Development, Teacher Content and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to From Memory and Memorization: There IS a Difference

  1. Cynthia says:

    This is fabulous! Thank you so much. I will share this!

  2. jenisesexton says:

    You made the difference very clear Graham! As a coach I would hate to hear teachers say, “We’ve worked on strategy, now they just need to memorize their facts.” Given time, students will commit the facts to memory through repeated use of a strategy. And I would say, more importantly, students will realize the relationship between numbers and apply that relationship to figure out unknown facts. Good stuff!!

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  5. Lori Martensen says:

    I am just seeing this for the first time. So powerful! I will use it my teachers. Thank you.

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